More drivers over 90 set to be on Britain's roads

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A study has discovered that the number of drivers over the age of 90 will rise by 18 per cent over the next five years.

A study has discovered that the number of drivers over the age of 90 will rise by 18 per cent over the next five years.

Research by The Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM) found that by 2017 there is expected to be around 82,400 over 90s on Britain's roads, up from the present figure of 70,000.

This is good news for motorists and car insurance policy holders, as older drivers are less likely to be involved in accidents compared with young people. The study discovered that drivers over the age of 70 account for eight per cent of UK motorists but are only involved in four per cent of crashes.

IAM chief executive Simon Best commented on the study's findings in a press release, stating that, "Today, over 10 million people can expect to reach 100 so the chances are they'll be driven around by their 70 year-old children. While their frailty puts them at risk if they are in a crash, that doesn't necessarily mean that they are a risk to other drivers.

"Despite the increase in numbers, we should resist calls for compulsory retests for elderly drivers. The government needs a strategy now on how it is going to manage more elderly drivers and make them more aware of the risks they face."

Other driver age groups will also see increases as the 'baby boomer' generation enter retirement, with the number of 80 year olds on the roads set to rise by 22 per cent to 1,283,000. A quarter of Britain's motorists are currently over 65 and this number will also expand over the next ten years.

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