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Magazine

Driving without MoT: you're more likely to get caught than ever before

Millions of motorists who are on the road without an MoT are more likely to face prosecution than ever before.

Millions of motorists who are on the road without an MoT are more likely to face prosecution than ever before.

Advances in the use of digital data, on top of police checks for motoring offences, means your chances of being caught driving illegally are higher than ever, according to the Department for Transport (DfT).

The Government does not collate official statistics for the number of vehicles on the road without a valid MoT certificate, but they believe the number is likely to be similar to those estimated to be driving without insurance or tax.

Research carried out by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders revealed a third of all motorists had driven a car without an MoT certificate; at the end of 2012 there were 35million vehicles on UK roads.

But a DfT spokesman said the number of motorists driving without an MoT is declining year on year.

"People should be aware that the police will always perform a number of routine checks - including a check for an up to date MoT certificate - whenever they stop a vehicle because of a suspected motoring offence," a DfT spokesman told motoring.co.uk

Motorists caught driving without an MoT certificate face a fine of up to £1,000, it can also invalidate your insurance policy which could lead to you getting points on your licence.

Ed Morrow, campaigns officer for road safety charity Brake, told motoring.co.uk: "All drivers have a responsibility to make sure both themselves and their vehicles are in a fit state to be on the road.

"Common vehicle defects such as worn tyres and brakes can kill, just as surely as the driver being drunk or tired. That's why it's vital to make sure your vehicle is in roadworthy condition with an annual MoT.

"Don't be tempted to dodge the cost - it could cost lives. However, don't assume your vehicle is safe just because it has a valid MoT - always do a walk-round check before you drive to check for tyre and wheel defects, tyre pressure and oil and water levels."